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Archive for the ‘beauty’ Category

An open letter to Rita Atria

Posted by E on July 26, 2012

This is a love letter to the sister I never had.

On July 26, 2012, the twentieth anniversary of your death, I want to say that I will never forget you, Rita. I want to shout your name from the rooftops, and hope that somewhere in the echoes that bounce back, you are still there. I want to say that even though I never met you, I will always consider you a sister of my heart. You are my shadow self – a firefly in the darkest sky, a girl who never grew to be a woman.

We were born 3 months apart in the latter half of the same year, in the same part of the continent. We were both loud, vivacious, black-haired, brown-eyed girls endowed with a penchant for mischief. You were born into a small village of Mafiosos and I was a street urchin seeking out a family among a group of hateful extremists who envisioned that they would one day rule the country.

We were both seventeen years old when we saw our “family” for what it really was and tried to get out. We were both seventeen when we began to compile information on the men who we had once trusted, looked up to, even loved. We were little girls who wanted to pretend that we were soldiers in a war greater than ourselves.

In the greater scheme of things, we were little children. Disobedient children who spied on our families and turned against men who had once held us close to them and called us “daughters.” We sat in open court and pointed to such men, denouncing them for the vile criminals that they were. You testified against the Cosa Nostra, men responsible for murdering your father. I testified against the Heritage Front and helped shut down Canada’s largest white supremacist organization, bankrolled and condoned by Canada’s Security Intelligence Service (CSIS).

We both betrayed the only family that had ever embraced us.

I am you, Rita, and you are me. We are no more or less than any other teenage girl who wants to make a difference in her life, who wants a better world for her unborn children. We are every girl who lives in fear today, yet holds within her heart the flicker of hope that she will one day be counted. That someday she might make a difference.

We both know the seclusion of safe-houses, the anonymity of a new haircut and a bottle of scalp-burning dye. The unfamiliar utterance of a new name in our mouths. We know what it is like to have an entire world hate us and call us traitors. We know the words grown men have spoken after us, the threats and hits that were placed on our heads. And the truth, Rita, is that we were both children. We were idealists with hardly any concept in our minds of the ugliness of the world, of the seclusion and loneliness that would come.

When you’re in hiding the sky is always starless, muffled by an oppression of perpetually-low clouds. There’s only the stillness of empty apartments, where the silence of incalculable whitewashed walls closes in on you. After a while, the danger is no longer as relevant as walking to the window to tear apart the curtains, regardless of who might be lurking below. Because all you can say to yourself is, When the gunfire erupts I will not duck, I will not retreat.

I wish I’d met you, Rita. I wish that I could hold your hand and call you Sister. When you climbed over that balcony and flew down to your death, broken-hearted after the Mafia assassinated your only friend, magistrate Paolo Borsellino, convinced that nothing would ever change, a part of me was there with you. A part of me has always longed to take flight too.

Every year that passes since your passing, after the great snowfalls recede and give way to the delicate beauty of new growth in spring, I think of the shadows of us two – two teenage girls who wanted to make this ugly, senseless world a better place.

You live in me, Rita. And I will never forget you.

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Posted in activism, beauty, cosa nostra, csis, family, freedom, history, identity, innocence, italy, letter, life, love, mafia, media, news, paolo borsellino, politics, revolution, rita atria, truth, Uncategorized, violence, war, women | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

something for the wish list….

Posted by E on November 5, 2010

 

I haven’t blogged in a while because of several stressful issues that I’ve been dealing with over the last couple of weeks. Plus, one of our cats has been quite sick and in turn I’ve been up to my neck in medicating, cleaning and fussing over him to the detriment of my own appearance.

But yesterday partner brought home one of those 1 ml samplers of a new fragrance, Idylle by Guerlain. I also got a sampler of the new Armani (same old kinda stuff), which couldn’t hold a candle next to Idylle. Now I haven’t bought a perfume for almost 2 years – I’m not into some of the new fruity, oriental fragrances that are chic these days. But I always squirt the samplers on, just in case.

Idylle really took me by surprise. At first it overwhelmed me – in a good, love-at-first-sniff sort of way – with a dazzling top note of rose and lily. It went kinda so-so flat in the middle notes, but the finale was just as magnificent as the first drop, but in a different way. Normally I don’t bother reviewing things like perfume, but I had to mention this one. It really stands out – I know everybody’s biochemistry is different, but on me this fragrance is superb. I’d describe it as a classic, timeless, elegant fragrance of flowers and femininity. It’s a deja vu – a walk along the Seine after a light spring rain, a Debussi sonata, mingled with the poise of a ballerina in Swan Lake and infused with the romance of St Petersburg on a winter evening.
It’s simply exquisite.
Supposedly it costs an arm and a leg, but I’m putting it on my wish list – at least until I encounter one that moves me more. So, if anybody wants to get on my good side, see the photo below for birthday gift ideas 😉

Posted in beauty, review | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

As requested, new contact lens pics

Posted by E on September 1, 2010

Following up on my last contacts-related entry, where I posted photos of me wearing Sterling Grey Freshlook contacts (my favourite colour so far), someone asked me to post my Acuvue Pearl Grey contacts – which as a close runner-up to my favourite tinted color. So here they are.
Honestly, if you want tinted contacts and are looking for a realistic colour that you can wear to pass for natural, or a natural-looking blue, you’ve gotta get grey (or gray, depending on spelling) contacts. Blue ones like Sapphire Blue look really fake on my medium-brown eyes. I hate them! I don’t tend to wear coloured contacts normally, but if I want to go for a striking look, I wear Freshlook Sterling Grey or Acuvue Pearl Grey.
All the photos in this entry are for the Acuvue Pearl Gray.
I took these with my iphone camera in both bright and darker indoor settings. There was no flash, so the photos came out looking pretty much like in real life.

This is more of a steel-blue colour, cold and striking, like a wolf’s eye. It’s an elegant colour that looks really natural even on someone more olive-complexioned, as I tend to get in the summer.
Finally, here’s me wearing a Pearl Gray in my right eye, and my regular transparent contacts in my left, to give you an idea of my natural brown eye colour.
Let me know if it helps! 🙂

Posted in beauty, contact lens | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

On nourishing the best minds of our generation

Posted by E on July 22, 2010

Writer colonies, retreats, artist centres, whatever you call it, are intended to provide that all-too-elusive sense of belonging and recognition to writers who otherwise labour away in the seclusion of their own abodes and their own idiosyncracies and particular neuroticisms.
Coming up for a breath of fresh air, as in attending a colony and being able to create while at the same time surrounded by a whole bunch of other creative minds is invaluable. The colonies are more than just a place to eat, sleep and write — they might just lead to new friendships and new perspectives that can enhance our otherwise solitary work.

Luckily for US artists, the United States provides an abundance of colonies and fellowships one can apply for. Places that have been frequented by artists like Sylvia Plath, Truman Capote, Saul Bellow, Patricia Highsmith, Toni Morrison, etc. I could start rattling off the names of a whole lot of places, but that’s not the point of this post. The point is, for something like 30-50 bucks and the cost of mailing in a portfolio, you can apply to attend artistic residences where all your accommodations, meals and board, etc, are completely covered up to 8 weeks.

We in Canada are not so lucky. Although arts councils are there to provide much-needed support to artists as they work on their projects, they don’t fund colonies or retreats, at least none that I know of. And all the ones I’ve checked, including the famous Banff Centre for the Arts, charge a hefty thousand bucks for five days of accommodations and meals….which, to be frank, who can afford unless they already have a day job, and therefore not exactly a full-time writer to begin with?
I witnessed something odd at the Humber Summer Workshop I attended (on a scholarship, thankfully!) two Julys ago: most of the participants were made up of middle-aged professionals, otherwise-known-as weekend warriors. Not to generalize, but what I’ve observed is that often those who can afford those expensive workshops are the same people who hardly have the time necessary to complete a full-length work, quality notwithstanding.

It’s a damn shame that we can’t offer as many possibilities as the US and other European nations provide their artists. People here bitch and moan every time funding gets cut at the individual level, but sometimes I think that perhaps if there was a place we could escape to for just a little while, where we wouldn’t have to worry about distractions, finances, etc — that it might be as useful as a big-ass cheque. And equally inspiring. Not that I’d be willing to trade my OAC and CAC funding, thank you very much 🙂 but still…. wouldn’t it be wonderful if such a place existed?

I know, going to a writers’ colony for a month is no guarantee that you can produce something substantial, but then again, neither does getting a huge chunk of money insure that a writer is able to commit to the page. But having said all that, the only place that I’ve found which subsidizes Canadian writers is Berton House in the Yukon, but you have to already have published at least one book to go there. And, well, it’s quite desolate and not exactly large enough to accommodate more than one or two persons at a time.

Sadly, even though financial assistance might be provided to one or two people per program, overall it seems that Canadian writing centres seem more geared toward weekend-type writers with large bank accounts than toward the younger or less affluent people who could most benefit from an opportunity to allow their brilliance to shine through. And in the end, through this insidious practice of cultural and financial elitism, everyone suffers.

Oh, I know — writing programs are basically lucrative cash cows that keep MFA grads and other senior writers employed, but at what cost? By excluding the talented in favour of the rich (though if you’re both, you’ve hit the jackpot!), how exactly does our culture advance?

One of my biggest dreams is to someday own a place where people can come and work on their projects, a place where all costs would be absorbed, and the artist is free only to create. But until I sell a crapload of books and maybe close a movie deal or two, this will remain a wishful dream.

Posted in art, beauty, canada, commentary, freedom, poetry, thoughts, Uncategorized, usa, writer, writing | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »